Dublin

Dublin
1. Dublinis the capital and largest city of Ireland Dublin is in the province of Leinster on Irelands east coast, at the mouth of the River Liffey.Founded as a Viking settlement, the Kingdom of Dublin became Irelands principal city following the Norman invasion. The city expanded rapidly from the 17th century and was briefly the second largest city in the British Empire before the Act of Union in 1800. Following the partition of Ireland in 1922, Dublin became the capital of the Irish Free State and later the Republic of Ireland.Dublin is administered by a City Council. The city is listed by the Globalization and World Cities Research Network (GaWC) as a global city, with a ranking of Alpha placing it among the top thirty cities in the world. It is a historical and contemporary centre for education, the arts, administration, economy and industry.
Dublin suffered a period of political and economic decline during the 19th century following the Act of Union of 1800, under which the seat of government was transferred to the Westminster Parliament in London. The city played no major role in the Industrial Revolution, but remained the centre of administration and a transport hub for most of the island. Ireland had no significant sources of coal, the fuel of the time, and Dublin was not a centre of ship manufacturing, the other main driver of industrial development in Britain and Ireland.Belfast developed faster than Dublin during this period on a mixture of international trade, factory based linen cloth production and shipbuilding. .....
National Museum of Ireland
2. Walk into the National Museum of Ireland on Kildare Street and you are magically transported back in time. A stroll through time will take you all the way back to 7,000BC.The Museum first opened its doors in 1890 and since then it has been filling in the blanks for us through its extensive archeological collections.Take time at The Treasury which features outstanding examples of Celtic and Medieval art, such as the famous Ardagh Chalice, the Tara Brooch and the Derrynaflan Hoard.Gaze in wonder at the finest collection of prehistoric gold artefacts in Europe, which is to be found in Or Irelands Gold. Ramble through prehistoric Ireland and experience life at the same time of the Vikings in Viking Age Ireland.Medieval Ireland 1150 1550, documents life in Ireland in the age of cathedrals, monasteries and castles.The new and fascinating Kingship & Sacrifice exhibition centres on a number of recently found bog bodies dating back to the Iron Age. Displayed along with other bog finds from the Museums collections, it offers you an opportunity to come face to face with your ancient ancestors. .....
Chester Beatty Library
3. With free admission and described by the Lonely Planet as not just the best museum in Ireland, but one of the best in Europe, the Chester Beatty Library is a must see on any Dublin visitors itinerary. As the only museum in Ireland to win European Museum of the Year and rated at number 3 in TripAdvisor s list of recommended Dublin cultural attractions, the librarys rich collections from countries across Asia, the Middle East, North Africa and Europe open a window on the artistic treasures of the great cultures and religions of the world.
Manuscripts, miniature paintings, prints, drawings, rare books and decorative arts complete this amazing collection all the result of the collecting activities of one man Sir Alfred Chester Beatty (1875 1968). Egyptian papyrus texts, beautifully illuminated copies of the Quran, the Bible, European medieval and renaissance manuscripts are among the highlights on display. In its diversity, the collection captures much of the richness of human creative expression from about 2700 BC to the present day.he Chester Beatty Library exhibits open a window on the artistic treasures of the great cultures and religions of the world. Their rich collection include manuscripts, prints, icons, miniature paintings, early printed books and objects dart from countries across Asia, the Middle East, North Africa and Europe. .....
Trinity College Library
4. Originally established outside the city walls of Dublin in the buildings of the dissolved Augustinian Priory of All Hallows, Trinity College was set up in part to consolidate the rule of the Tudor monarchy in Ireland, and it was seen as the university of the Protestant Ascendancy for much of its history. Although Catholics and Dissenters had been permitted to enter as early as 1793,[7] certain restrictions on their membership of the college remained until 1873 (professorships, fellowships and scholarships were reserved for Protestants),[8] and the Catholic Church in Ireland forbade its adherents, without permission from their bishop, from attending until 1970. Women were first admitted to the college as full members in 1904.

Trinity College is now surrounded by Dublin and is located on College Green, opposite the former Irish Houses of Parliament. The college proper occupies 190,000 m2 (47 acres), with many of its buildings ranged around large quadrangles (known as squares) and two playing fields. Academically, it is divided into three faculties comprising 25 schools, offering degree and diploma courses at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels. In 2011, it was ranked by the Times Higher Education World University Rankings as the 110th best university in the world, by the QS World University Rankings as the 65th best, by the Academic Ranking of World Universities as within the 201 300 range, and by all three as the best university in Ireland.[9][10][11] The Library of Trinity College is a legal deposit library for Ireland and the United Kingdom, containing over 4.5 million printed volumes and significant quantities of manuscripts (including the Book of Kells), maps and music. .....

Kilmainham Gaol
5. Kilmainham Gaol (Jail) is one of the largest unoccupied gaols in Europe, it was involved in some of the most heroic and tragic events in Irelands history and its emergence as a modern nation from 1780s to the 1920s. When it was built in 1796, Kilmainham Gaol was referred to as the New Gaol to distinguish it from the old gaol it was designed to replace. Over the 128 years it served as a prison, its cells held many of the most famous people involved in the campaign for Irish independence. The British imprisoned and executed the leaders of the 1916 Easter Rising here including Padraig Pearse, Joseph Plunkett and Thomas Clarke.Children were sometimes arrested for petty theft and held in the prison, the youngest said to be a seven year old boy. Many of the adult prisoners were eventually deported to Australia after their stay.Men, women and children were imprisoned together, up to 5 in each cell, often with only a single candle for light and heat. Most of their time was spent in the cold and the dark as each candle had to last the prisoner for two weeks. At Kilmainham women were held in particularly poor conditions considering it was an age that prided itself on a protective attitude for the weaker sex. As early as his 1809 report the Inspector had observed that male prisoners were supplied with iron bedsteads while females lay on straw on the flags in the cells and common halls. Fifty years later there was little improvement. The womens section, located in the west wing, remained overcrowded. .....
Croke Park
6. In the 1980s the organisation decided to investigate ways to increase the capacity of the old stadium. The design for an 80,000 capacity stadium was completed in 1991. Gaelic sports have special requirements as they take place on a large field. A specific requirement was to ensure the spectators were not too far from the field of play. This resulted in the three tier design from which viewing games is possible: the main concourse, a premium level incorporating hospitality facilities and an upper concourse. The premium level contains restaurants, bars and conference areas.
The project was split into four phases over a 14 year period.During the Irish War of Independence on 21 November 1920 Croke Park was the scene of a massacre by the Royal Irish Constabulary (RIC). The Police, supported by the British Auxiliary Division entered the ground, shooting indiscriminately into the crowd killing or fatally wounding 14 during a Dublin Tipperary Gaelic football match. The dead included 13 spectators and Tipperarys captain, Michael Hogan. Posthumously, the Hogan stand built in 1924 was named in his honour. These shootings, on the day which became known as Bloody Sunday, were a reprisal for the assassination of 15 people associated with the Cairo Gang, a group of British Intelligence officers, by Michael Collinss squad earlier that day. .....
Guinness Storehouse
7. The Storehouse is laid out over seven floors surrounding a glass atrium shaped in the form of a pint of Guinness.The ground floor introduces the beers four ingredients (water, barley, hops and yeast), and the brewerys founder, Arthur Guinness. Other floors feature the history of Guinness advertising and include an interactive exhibit on responsible drinking. The seventh floor houses the Gravity Bar with views of Dublin and where visitors may drink a pint of Guinness included in the price of admission, which was .....
Phoenix Park
8. The Phoenix Park is one of the largest and most magnificent city parks in Europe at 707 hectares. It is an historic landscape of international importance and one of the largest designed landscapes in any European city.2012 saw the 350th anniversary celebrations of the park.About 30% of the Phoenix Park is covered by trees, which are mainly broadleaf parkland species such as oak, ash, lime, beech, sycamore and horsechestnut.A more ornamental selection of trees is grown in the various enclosures. A herd of Fallow Deer has lived in the Park since the 1660s when they were introduced by the Duke of Ormond.The Phoenix Park is a sanctuary for many mammals and birds and a wide range of wildlife habitats are to be found in the park.
One such area is the Furry Glen, which is managed as a conservation area.Aras an Uachtarain, the residence of the President of Ireland dates from 1750 and is located in the centre of the park adjacent to the United States Ambassadors residence, which was built in 1774.Many other historic buildings and monuments are located in the Park. Dublin Zoo is also contained within the grounds of the park! The Phoenix Park is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, all year round.The Victorian Kitchen Walled Garden, beside the Phoenix Park Visitor Centre, is currently under restoration and is open daily to the public from 10am to 5pm. .....
Dublin Castle
9. Dublin Castle Originally built in the 13th century on a site previously settled by the Vikings it functioned as a military fortress, a prison, treasury, courts of law and the seat of English Administration in Ireland for 700 years. Rebuilt in the 17th, 18th, 19th and 20th centuries, Dublin Castle is now used for important State receptions and Presidential Inaugurations. The State Apartments, Undercroft, Chapel Royal, Craft Shop, Heritage Centre and Restaurant are open to visitors. (On occasions Dublin Castle can be closed at very short notice for Government business). Access for visitors with disabilities to State Apartments, Chapel Royal and restaurant.Location: Situated in the City Centre off Dame St., behind City Hall, 5 minutes walk from Trinity College en route to Christchurch.

Originally built in the 13th century, the Anglo Norman castle burned down in 1684. Sir William Robinson then developed plans for a re build. Without major defensive installations and with an eye on providing the government with a fine contemporary home. Thus present day Dublin Castle was born. And visitors will usually only notice the Record Tower as being truly medieval. The adjoining Chapel Royal (rather its replacement, the Church of the Most Holy Trinity) was only finished in 1814 and is about 600 years younger but with a beautiful neo gothic exterior and a hundred intricately carved heads.When viewed from the park (which has a gigantic Celtic spiral ornament doubling as a helipad) the strange mixture of styles becomes evident. On the left the 13th century Bermingham Tower was converted into a supper room, brightly colored but uninspiring facades follow, then the romantic Octagonal Tower (from 1812), the Georgian State Apartments and the Record Tower (with the Garda Museum in the basement) and the Chapel round the ensemble off. The inner yards are dominated by brickwork, quite a contrast. .....

National Gallery of Ireland
10. The National Gallery of Ireland ouses the Irish national collection of Irish and European art. It is located in the centre of Dublin with one entrance on Merrion Square, beside Leinster House, and another on Clare Street. Due to ongoing renovations, the Clare Street entrance is the only one currently open. It was founded in 1854 and opened its doors ten years later. The Gallery has an extensive, representative collection of Irish painting and is also notable for its Italian Baroque and Dutch masters painting. The current director of the gallery is Sean Rainbird. Entry to the gallery is free. The National Gallery of Ireland holds the national collection of European and Irish fine art. Admission is free to the permanent and temporary collections. The gallery is currently undergoing an extensive refurbishment plan and remains partly open to the public during the works. Please note that entrance to the gallery is via the Clare Street entrance.Masterpieces from the Collection is a special presentation of some of the finest works in the Gallerys collection, now open in the Beit Wing and Millennium Wing (rooms 1 10).

It includes both Irish and European masterpieces.The Images & Licensing Department manages Intellectual Property of the National Gallery of Irelands art collection as well as the commercial Picture Library. We have a unique and ever expanding collection of high quality images captured by our in house professional photographers, which reflect our collections various facets. We also have a proprietary database of artists and copyright holders to help with rights clearances. Using our online search and e commerce facility, you can research and purchase online and immediately download a wide range of images. .....

Aras an Uachtarain
11. Now the Residence of the President of Ireland, aras an Uachtarain, started as a modest brick house for the Phoenix Park Chief Ranger in 1751. It was subsequently acquired as an occasional residence for the Lords Lieutenants and gradually evolved to a large mansion. After Ireland gained independence, it was occupied by three Governors General between 1922 and 1937, prior to the first president Dr Douglas Hyde taking up residence there. 19th century architects Francis Johnston, Jacob Owen and Decimus Burton, and more recently, Raymond McGrath, as well as stuccodores Michael Stapleton and Bartholomew Cramillion contributed to its gradual expansion, gardens and interiors. Location In the Phoenix Park, signposted from the Phoenix Monument 4km from centre of Dublin.aras an Uachtarain is open Saturdays only.
Free admission tickets are issued at the Phoenix Park Visitor Centre on the day. Group and/or advance booking is not permitted.Aras an Uachtarain is now the official residence of the President of Ireland. The house is open to the public each Saturday and 5 200 people visit the formal rooms and view the grounds each year. In addition to official guests at the many state functions hosted by the President, more than 11,000 visit the house by invitation each year. .....
The Custom House
12. IT IS a little remarkable, that though disinclined to talk overmuch of myself and my affairs at the fireside, and to my personal friends an autobiographical impulse should twice in my life have taken possession of me, in addressing the public. The first time was three or four years since, when I favored the reader inexcusably, and for no earthly reason, that either the indulgent reader or the intrusive author could imagine with a description of my way of life in the deep quietude of an Old Manse. And now because, beyond my deserts, I was happy enough to find a listener or two on the former occasion I again seize the public by the button, and talk of my three years experience in a Custom House. The example of the famous P.P., Clerk of this Parish, .....
Leinster House
13. Originally named the Kildare House, the Leinster House began as a home for James Fitzgerald, the Earl of Kildare. Fitzgerald wanted a mansion that would reflect his prominence in Irish society. The neighborhood, on the south side of Dublin, was considered unfashionable. But after Fitzgerald and his German born architect, Richard Cassels, built the Georgian manor, prominent people were drawn to the area.In 1776, the same year America declared its independence from Britain, Fitzgerald became the Duke of Leinster. Fitzgeralds home was renamed the Leinster House. Leinster House was greatly admired and became a model for many other important buildings. Its likely that James Hoban, who studied in Dublin, saw designs for the Leinster House before he created his prize winning plans for Americas White House in Washington, DC.
Today, the Leinster House is the seat of the Irish Parliament and also an architectural twin to Americas presidential home.The decision of the influential and trend setting earl to locate his mansion on what were then just open fields, encouraged the migration of the gentry and the wealthy to the surrounding area from the previously traditional fashionable parts of the city. Thus grew the largest Georgian styled district of Dublin which has remained largely intact to this day.Built in 1745, this beautiful building inspired the making of the White House and now serves as the Irish Parliament. .....
Christ Church Cathedral
14. Christ Church Cathedral is one of Dublins oldest buildings, a leading visitor attraction and a place of pilgrimage for almost 1,000 years. Famous for its breathtaking beauty, magnificent architectural features and wonderful floor tiles, Christ Church is also popular as a venue and is host to many high profile concerts throughout the year. It is home to the tomb of Strongbow, leader of the Normans, who captured Dublin in 1170. The Medieval Crypt, one of the largest in Britain and Ireland, extends under the entire Cathedral and contains The Mummified cat and rat, trapped in the organ in the 1860s. Christ Church Cathedral (founded c.1028) is the spiritual heart of the city, and one of the top visitor attractions in Dublin. Step inside and you can enjoy the cathedral s beautiful interior and fascinating medieval crypt.There s so much to see and discover at Christ Church Cathedral.

Here are a few ideas to get you started.Follow the steps that bring you beneath the cathedral and explore the medieval crypt, one of the largest in Britain & Ireland, and the earliest surviving structure in the city. The crypt houses fascinating memorials, the cat and the rat, The Treasury, an audio visual presentation, the cathedral shop and the Cathedral Caf?. The crypt can also be hired for events.Standing on high ground in the oldest part of Dublin, Christ Church Cathedral is one of the citys finest historic buildings. Part of the Anglican Church of Ireland, the cathedral is the mother church for the diocese of Dublin and Glendalough. It is one of two Protestant cathedrals in Dublin; the other being St. Patricks Cathedral, just to the south. .....

National Library of Ireland
15. The National Library of Ireland holds the most outstanding collection of Irish documentary material in the world. There are three reading rooms and a Genealogy Advisory Service to assist family history researchers. The Library also has two major exhibitions, the multi awarding winning Yeats the life and work of WB Yeats and Strangers to Citizens the Irish in Europe 1600 1800. Entry to the Library and exhibitions is free.With over eight million items in its collection, the National Library of Ireland in Dublin City is home to the most comprehensive compilation of Irish documentary material in the world. From music, periodicals and photographs to maps, manuscripts and genealogical material, the library offers and provides free access to an invaluable representation of Irish heritage. Explore the poetry and legacy of Ireland s greatest poet in the award winning exhibition Yeats: the Life and Works of William Butler Yeats .....
Dublin Zoo
16. One of the worlds oldest zoos, Dublin Zoo is also modern in design and houses more than 600 animals. It has been redesigned in recent years to be a safe environment for people and the animals with gardens, lakes and natural habitats. Activities for older children, Activities for young childrenDublin Zoo, located in the Phoenix Park in the heart of Dublin city, is Ireland s No.1 visitor attraction and welcomed almost one million visitors last year.As one of the world s oldest and most popular zoos, the 70 acre park in the heart of Dublin is home to some 600 animals in an environment where education and conservation combine for an exciting and unforgettable experience.See many rare and exotic animals living and roaming a wide variety of natural habitats. Wander through the African Savanna and gaze at the giraffes, zebras, scimitar oryx and ostrich, then head to the Kaziranga Forest to see the magnificent herd of Asian elephants that call this beautiful place home. Experience the heat of the South American House before heading to Family farm and don t forget to visit the soon to be opened Gorilla Rainforest.

There are plenty of amazing animals to discover including tigers, hippos, bats, rare monkeys, gorillas, chimpanzees, red pandas and reptiles to name but a few.Conservation is an important part of Dublin Zoo s work, and as a registered charity the zoo relies on the generosity of friends and visitors to help fund the internationally acclaimed education, conservation and breeding programmes.Dublin Zoo is easily accessible by car or public transport and open all year round from 9.30am daily so be sure to get there early and pack everything into one fun filled family day! .....

Anna Livia
17. Eamonn O Dohertys Anna Livia sculpture was originally situated on O Connell Street. It was commissioned by businessman Michael Smurfit in memory of his father, Jefferson Smurfit, to mark Dublins 1988 millennium celebrations. The sloped fountain attracted litter, washing up liquid, and a slew of the obligatory rhyming nicknames the floozie in the jacuzzi, the hoor in the sewer, etc. It was removed from O Connell Street in 2001 during the street s renovations. Here s the original statue .Croppies Acre Memorial Park seems to be a much more successful home. Anna Livia arrived early in 2011, transported along her namesake (the River Liffey/Abhainn na Life) to this tiny park near Heuston Station. Next door is Croppy s Field, in front of the National Museum (Decorative Arts and History) at Collins Barracks and similarly named for the reputed burial place of rebels executed in the 1798 rebellion, but this is a separate little sliver of park on the point of the triangular block.
The park is very simple and highly recommended if you re looking for a quiet moment before catching a train. The trees are mature, the benches are intact, the planting is colourful, and the focal point is the bean shaped pond in the centre. Anna Livia was modified and refurbished by .....
Convention Centre Dublin
18. The Convention Centre Dublin in the Dublin Docklands was opened in September 2010. The Convention centre overlooks the River Liffey at Spencer Dock. It was designed by the American Irish architect Kevin Roche. The CCD was shortlisted for the Engineers Ireland Excellence Awards Engineering Project of the Year 2010.In 1995 the then Irish government planned to build a National Convention Centre but this plan was abandoned. Minister for Tourism Enda Kenny had announced the location of the proposed convention centre to be at the RDS in Ballsbridge ? this proved to be a dead end.In November 1997 with the new Fianna Fail led government elected, a new competition to build the conference center was launched by Tourism Minister James McDaid, with seven consortiums entering. The Office of Public Works proposed to build the convention centre at Infirmary Road beside the Phoenix Park. The Ogden/Sonas Centre group headed by Robert White, whose plans for a casino based scheme at the Phoenix Park had been abandoned by the previous government, also entered the competition.

The Anna Livia Consortium, comprising Earlsfort Group, Bennett Construction and Kilsarin Concrete, proposed a conference centre complex within Dublin Port across the street from the O2.Treasury Holdings, headed by Johnny Ronan and Richard Barrett, the ultimate winners of the competition, entered into an agreement with CIE to locate its project at Spencer Dock. Developer Harry Crosbie was also part of the consortium. Their plan included plans for two 250 bedroom hotels, at least one of which was never ultimately built. One hotel had been planned for the rear of the Convention Centre, but this was instead turned into a park. The closing date for entries was 31 January 1998.The European Union agreed to provide a maximum grant of .....

Old Jameson Distillery
19. visit to the Old Jameson Distillery is so much more than just a tour, it is an exciting and engaging experience, guaranteed to enlighten and entertain any visitor.Re live the story of John Jameson & Son through the history, the atmosphere and above all the taste. You will discover the time honoured secret of how three simple ingredients water, barley and yeast are transformed into smooth golden spirit that has always been and continues to be Jameson Irish Whiskey. After the Tour, all visitors are rewarded with a Jameson signature drink and lucky volunteers are selected to participate in a tutored whiskey comparison and earn a much coveted personalised Whiskey Taster Certificate.The Old Jameson Distillery Gift Shop stocks a wide range of gift ideas including a full portfolio of Jameson Irish Whiskeys. .....
National Botanic Gardens
20. The National Botanic Gardens is noted for its fine plant collections holding over 15,000 plant species and cultivars from a variety of habitats from all around the world. Famous for its exquisitely restored and planted glasshouses, notably the Turner Curvilinear Range and the Great Palm House, both recipients of the Europa Nostra award for excellence in conservation architecture. Visitors can enjoy such features as the Herbaceous borders, rose garden, the alpine yard, the pond area, rock garden and arboretum. Conservation plays an important role in the life of the botanic garden and Glasnevin is home to over 300 endangered plant species from around the world including 6 species, which are already extinct in the wild.
The National Botanic Gardens founded in 1795 by the Dublin Society, is well regarded for its fine plant collections of over 15,000 species from a wide range of habitats from all around the world. It is famous for its exquisitely restored and planted glasshouses. Guests can visit the herbaceous borders, rose garden, the alpine yard, the pond area, rock garden and arboretum. Conservation plays an important role in the life of the botanic garden and Glasnevin is home to over 300 endangered plant species from around the world including 6 species, which are already extinct in the wild. .....
St. Michans Church
21. Welcome to St Michans Parish Church in the heart of inner city Dublin. Divine worship has been offered on this site since 1095 and continues today.We are a small community of people who seek Gods nearer presence in Word and Sacrament. We are a parish of the Church of Ireland and part of the worldwide Anglican Communion.St Michans is open daily for private prayer and the Holy Eucharist is celebrated on the second and fourth Sunday of the month at 10am.St Michan s is also the parish church to the Law Courts of Ireland.You are most welcome to join us at any time. In addition we welcome thousands of tourists each year to visit our famous crypts, where the visitor will encounter mummified remains dating back centuries.The St. Michan church has an interesting history even without the mummies.
The foundation of the church was built in 1095 to serve the remaining and ostracized Vikings, who were still in Ireland after the rest had been killed or kicked out by Wolf the Quarrelsome and other Irish forces in 1014. The church was rebuilt in 1686, and a large pipe organ was installed in 1724, on which Handel is said to have first played the Messiah. But all along, as the church changed, the crypt stayed the same: slowly mummifying all that lay within it.There are a number of theories as to why the corpses in the basement have been preserved over time. One is that the basement contains limestone, making the basement particularly dry and therefore good for mummification. Another is that the church was built on former swamp land, and that methane gas is acting as a kind of preservative of the bodies. Other theories involve the presence of oak wood in the soil, or the building materials used in the church. .....
National Aquatic Centre
22. quaZone, at the National Aquatic Centre, is one of the most innovative water parks in Europe. A whole host of exciting features ensures that there is lots of family fun, thrills ? and something for everyone.If you crave extreme thrills, raging water adventures, flying through the air, or just an enjoyable day with your family, AquaZone at the National Aquatic Centre has Europes biggest and best water rides and attractions waiting for you.The National Aquatic Centre (NAC) (Irish: Ionad Naisi .....
Powerscourt Estate
23. One of the worlds great Gardens, Powerscourt is situated 20km south of Dublin City Centre in the foothills of the Wicklow mountains.The Garden was begun by Richard Wingfield in the 1740s and stretches out over 47 acres. It is a sublime blend of formal gardens, sweeping terraces, and ornamental lakes together with secret hollows, rambling walks, walled gardens and over 200 varieties of trees and shrubs.The House was gutted by fire in 1974 but recently has been reborn as an exceptional tourist destination. An audio visual brings to life the rich history of the Estate, while the double height Georgian Ballroom has been restored and hosts wedding and special events.

The House is now home to the best in Irish design in gifts, clothes and furniture in the Avoca Stores and Interiors Gallery. Treat yourself to lunch at the Terrace Cafe where you can enjoy exceptional food, from each loaf of Irish bread to Mediterranean tarts or extraordinary salads. Come and explore all that Powerscourt House & Gardens has to offer, theres something for everyone from little explorers to garden enthusiasts.Today the estate is owned and run by the Slazenger family. It is a popular tourist attraction, and includes a golf course, an Avoca Handweavers restaurant, and an Autograph Collection hotel. .....

Iveagh Gardens
24. The Iveagh Gardens are among the finest and least known of Dublins park and gardens.They are located south of St. Stephens Green between Harcourt Street and Earlsfort Terrace, secluded from the city noise and bustle.They were designed by Ninian Niven in 1863 and include a rustic grotto, cascade, fountains, maze, rosarium, archery grounds, wilderness and woodlands.The gardens in their present form were laid out in 1863 by Benjamin Guinness after he had built what is now Iveagh House on St. Stephens Green. Previously the land had been laid out as a private pleasure garden by Copper faced Jack , Earl of Clonmell.During the early 19th century the gardens were opened to the public and were called the Coburg Gardens, after the royal family of Saxe Coburg. By 1860 they had fallen into disrepair and were restored by Benjamin Guinness. They were designed by Ninian Niven, in 1865, as an intermediate design between the French Formal and the English Landscape styles. They demonstrated the artistic skills of the landscape Architect of the mid 19th century.His son Edward, the first Earl of Iveagh, gave the gardens to the newly chartered University College Dublin in 1908, whose main building was then on nearby Earlsfort Terrace. In gratitude they were renamed the Iveagh Gardens. .....
The Royal Hospital
25. The Royal Hospital Kilmainham, also known as Irish Museum of Modern Art, has hosted amazing artists. Located close to Dublin s City Centre, this venue offers festival like atmosphere in Ireland s capital.In 2014 the venue will host Paul Weller, Jack White, Elbow, The Coronas etc.At the 17th Century Royal Hospital Kilmainham you will find a unique blend of the old and new. Since 1991 it has been home to the Irish Museum of Modern Art. One of the countrys premier banqueting venues, the RHK prides itself on maintaining high standards for our corporate clients, offering a personal service and attention to detail.

By only hosting one event within the North Range at any one time, we ensure that you, the client, have our undivided attention. This venue is ideal for conferences, product launches, gala banquets and exhibitions.The Royal Hospital Kilmainham is an unrivalled setting for any event large or small. Classical in style and unique in setting, the RHK has gained a superb reputation as a lavish venue in Ireland. Its splendour has to be seen to be believed. With this in mind, our professional and dedicated events specialists will be delighted to have the opportunity to show you the many charms of our extensive facilities.We cater for groups of up to a maximum of 1500 guests eating buffet style. As an additional attractive feature, we provide free car parking facilities for over 400 cars. .....

Irish Museum of Modern Art
26. The Irish Museum of Modern Art is the primary national institution in Ireland for the collection, organization and exhibition of modern art. The art is displayed through a variety of often changing exhibitions. A lot of the art displayed at the Museum is from the Museum s own collection, though the Museum maintains a policy of hosting many visiting exhibitions throughout the year.Of particular pride is the Museum s award winning Department of Education and Community.

Through this, the Museum creates a wider access for the general public to art and artists.The Irish Museum of Modern Art was officially opened to the public in May 1991. It is situated in Royal Hospital Kilmainham, which is a historic 17th century building to the West of Dublin s city centre near Heuston Station. This building is modeled on Les Invalides in Paris with a central courtyard surrounded by long corridors with numerous interconnected rooms. This allows for a great variety in exhibitions or for a story to be told sequentially through the art. The old, almost baroque building provides a stunning counterpoint to the modern art, framing it beautifully.Unfortunately, due to the style of the Museum, it is unable to house large works of art and it is difficult to move artwork around.The Museum s focus is upon contemporary art created by still breathing artists. It only buys from studios and galleries. .....

National Concert Hall
27. Since its founding in 1993, NCH Capital has formed twenty four funds targeting inefficiencies in capital starved markets. The firms deep value strategies are executed, depending on the local opportunity set, through investments in real estate, agribusiness, private equity and publicly quoted securities. Today, approximately half of our AUM is committed to agriculture, mostly in Ukraine and Russia, making NCH one of the largest farm operators in the world. In 2010 we made a strategic decision to extend the entrepreneurial vision and deep value philosophy of the founding partners with the opening of an office in Brazil to cover investment opportunities in Latin America. The NCH presence there is a natural extension of our long standing participation in emerging markets and our belief in the unique opportunities they offer. Following three years of successful incubation with the private capital of NCH founders, the NCH LatAm Fund (long only equity) was opened to outside capital on January 1, 2014.

NCH Capital manages over $3.4 billion of capital through a network of ten offices in Eastern Europe, Russia and Brazil, with a professional staff of over 200 colleagues who are fully integrated in their local business communities. All office heads have extensive investment, management, technical, analytical, financial, and legal experience in their respective markets, and most have been with us since NCH s formative years. We believe the scale of our platform, our well established local roots, access to capital, strength of reputation, and ready access to idea flow provide us with an execution edge that has contributed significantly to our success. NCH Corporation is a major international marketer of maintenance products, and one of the largest companies in the world to sell such products through direct marketing. NCHs products include specialty chemicals, industrial maintenance supplies, pet products, and plumbing parts. These products are sold through a number of wholly owned subsidiaries, many of which are engaged in the maintenance products business. Subsidiary companies in NCHs Chemical Specialties Division include National Chemsearch and Certified Laboratories. These companies offer customers in diverse industries a wide range of value added cost saving maintenance products and services including industrial drain and waste biologicals, oils and lubricants, and industrial maintenance chemicals.

The Division also includes the following subsidiaries; X Chem / Terra Services, an oil field chemical products and services division; Pure Solve, a partswashing service business; and Chem Aqua, a water treatment service business. Companies in the Partsmaster group offer a wide variety of items for maintenance and repair, including welding supplies and fasteners. The Plumbing Products Group provides plumbing supplies for the do it yourself retail consumer and the OEM market. The Retail Products Group markets a wide range of pet supplies. NCH has over 8,500 employees. Its branch offices and manufacturing plants are located on six continents, and its products are sold in over 50 different countries. Revenue for the most recent fiscal year fiscal year exceeded $1 billion. .....

Irish National War Memorial Gardens
28. The Irish National War Memorial Gardens have gone through a series of mutations to get to where they are today. The concept, in 1919, was to honour the Irish who died in WWI. This applied both North and South as the whole island was then under British rule. Funds were raised by a special Committee at the time, but it was not until the period 1933 39 that the gardens were laid out and they were not formally officially dedicated and opened until 1988, almost 70 years after the original concept. There were various reasons for the delays both in construction and dedication, including wrangling over the location, the outbreak of WWII, and a certain national lack of interest by the new state in those who fought for the British.The gardens were designed by Sir Edward Lutyens, who had also designed memorials in other parts of the world. This one is in a very favourable location on the southbank of the Liffey. A series of tree lined avenues radiate from a temple and give a magnificent approach to the main commemorative area. Each avenue is planted with different varieties of trees. You can see the plan from the air thanks to Google maps. The centrepiece of the main area is the War Stone set out like an altar, with the Great Cross directly behind it. The stone is the same proportions as others in other locations. The inscription in front reads Their name liveth for evermore .

A little ironic given the neglect of decades but happily now fully honoured not only in the concept but in the active maintenance of the site. The site is now the focus of various commemorative ceremonies during the year. Signs of one such commemoration were still in evidence on one of my visits. The poppy plays a large part in these ceremonies as it evokes the slaughter fields where it grows in great profusion. To the British it is purely a symbol of commemoration, honouring the dead, and supporting the charity that sees after dependents and survivors. Unfortunatley, it has been seen as a provocative sectarian symbol by many nationalists both North and South. While this is understandable in view of the long history of oppression of nationalists by Crown forces, it is also anomalous given the significant number of Irish people who died in the British Army in WWI (and also, of course, in WWII, but that story is for another time and place). .....

Bull Island
29. Bull Island (Oilean an Tairbh in Irish) or more properly North Bull Island (Oilean an Tairbh Thuaidh in Irish) is an island located in Dublin Bay in Ireland, about 5 km long and 800 m wide, lying roughly parallel to the shore off Clontarf (including Dollymount), Raheny, Kilbarrack, and facing Sutton. The island, with a sandy beach known as Dollymount Strand running its entire length, is a relatively recent, and inadvertent, result of human intervention in the bay.A wooden bridge, the first Bull Bridge, was erected in 1819 to facilitate the construction of a stone wall, based on a design by Ballast Board engineer, George Halpin. Started in 1820, the Bull Wall was completed in 1825, at a cost of .....
St Marys Pro Cathedral
30. The two main cathedrals (Christ Church and St. Patricks) of Dublin belong to the Protestant Church of Ireland, so St. Marys Pro Cathedral (meaning acting cathedral and known affectionately as The Pro ) is the closest the Catholics get to having their own.St. Marys Pro Cathedral was built between 1815 and 1825 on the site of a 12th century Cistercian Abbey of St. Mary.St. Marys is not an official cathedral, even though it functions as one. Why? Back when Christ Church Cathedral was built, the pope consecrated it as the Catholic cathedral of Dublin.

Although Christ Church has been Protestant for centuries, no pope has ever revoked its original designation. Since a city can only have one Catholic cathedral, St. Marys cannot enjoy that status until Christ Churchs is revoked.Tucked into a corner of a rather unimpressive back street, St. Marys is in the heart of Dublins north side and functions as the main Catholic parish church of the city center. The church is noted for its Palestrina Choir, which sings a Latin Mass every Sunday at 11am.The cathedral is in the Neo Classic Doric style, which provides a distinct contrast to the Gothic Revival look of most other churches of the period. The exterior portico is modeled on the Temple of Theseus in Athens, with six Doric columns, while the Renaissance style interior is patterned after the Church of St. Philip de Reule of Paris. .....

James Joyce Tower and Museum
31. The James Joyce Tower was one of a series of Martello towers built to withstand an invasion by Napoleon and now holds a museum devoted to the life and works of James Joyce, who made the tower the setting for the first chapter of his masterpiece, Ulysses.Beautifully located eight miles south of Dublin on the coast road, this tower is the perfect setting for a museum dedicated to Joyce, a writer of international renown who remains, world wide, the writer most associated with Dublin.Joyces brief stay here inspired the opening of his great novel Ulysses. The gun platform with its panoramic view, and the living room inside the tower are much as he described them in his book.The museums collection includes letters, photographs, first and rare editions and personal possessions of Joyce, as well as items associated with the Dublin of Ulysses.Ulysses was set on 16th June 1904. On Bloomsday, 16th June, the museum will be open from 8am 6pm for readings and celebrations. .....
Dublin Heuston railway station
32. Dublin Heuston commonly called Heuston Station, is one of Irelands main railway stations, serving the south, southwest and west. It is operated by Iarnrod Eireann , the national railway operator. It also houses the head office of IEs parent company, Coras Iompair Eireann.Although there is a physical rail link between Connolly Station and Heuston, via the Phoenix Park Tunnel, this is usually only used for freight and rolling stock movements. Once or twice a year special trains may operate, usually from Cork to Connolly for Gaelic Athletic Association matches in Croke Park.However, both the No. 90 bus and the Luas light rail system connect the two stations. .....
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